Oh Baby!!!

Common Baby Aiments - Nappy Rash & Teething

Posted 15 October 2019

2 of the most common ailments for babies; Nappy rash and Teething.  The advice you need to know.

What You Should Know About Teething

Teething is part of your child’s natural development and most commonly starts between 6 -10 months of age.  Discomfort may start earlier, so don’t be alarmed if your child is drooling and putting things in their mouth at this time.

Teeth begin forming in the gums before your baby is born.  They start breaking through gums in the first year, typically starting with the bottom middle teeth, followed by the top 2 middle ones, and then those along the sides and back.  This will go on for the first three years or so of your child’s life.

Sure Signs Of Teething

Teeth begin forming in the gums before your baby is born.  They start breaking through the gums in the first year typically starting with the bottom middle teeth, followed by the top 2 middle ones, and then those along the sides and back. 

Some of the symptoms listed may also be not due to teething but due to another illness, particularly since babies tend to explore their world by putting things in their mouth.

Teething Help 

Below are simple and effective home remedies that may help sooth your baby’s teething pain.

Give your child something to chew on;

  • Teething Ring
  • Refrigerate a dampened wash towel
  • Chilled food such as apple puree or yoghurt if your child has started solid food.
  • Teething rusks might also be suitable if your child has started on finger foods
  • Massage your child’s gums with a clean finger or a moistened gauze pad.
  • If your child is in discomfort, you can use a pain-relieving medication like paracetamol. 

You should take your child to the doctor if your child seems unwell or has other symptoms. 

 

 

 

 

What You Should Know About Nappy Rash

Even the best cared for babies may experience nappy rash.  Your baby’s tender skin is delicate and can be irritated by stools, urine, humidity, detergents, soaps, alcohol and chemicals in lotions and oils.

How To Recognise Nappy Rash

Nappy rash symptoms can vary from a shiny patch of red skin, scaly skins, spotty, bright red skin if the rash becomes secondarily infected.

When Does Nappy Rash Occur?

There may be no obvious reason for nappy rash occurring in your child.  Some babies have more sensitive skin than others and even the best cared for babies may experience nappy rash.  The most common cause is when the skin becomes inflamed after contact with the chemicals in urine, faeces or both.  Nappy rash is most likely to occur if nappies are not changed often enough or if the baby has diarrhea.  Friction caused by the nappy rubbing against baby’s delicate skin and washing detergents.

Nappy rash can happen at any time and there may be no obvious reasons as some babies naturally have more sensitive skin and may be more prone to the condition.

However, there are certain times where babies are more susceptible to nappy rash, such as:

  •  During teething
  • Changing from breast to bottle feeding
  • When starting on solid food
  • After antibiotics, which can upset baby’s digestive system
  • Drinking Cow’s milk for the first time.
  • Eating acidic foods such as citrus, tomatoes and strawberries.

Is Nappy Rash Serious?

The extent of nappy can vary greatly.  The burning and itching feeling of nappy rash may cause baby to be uncomfortable, irritable and restless.  While it may be sore for baby the good news is that it is usually not serious.

How To Prevent and Treat Nappy Rash

There are a number of ways to prevent baby from getting nappy rash:

  • Change baby’s nappy as soon as possible after soiling
  • Use a fragrance- and alcohol-free baby wipe
  • Wash the nappy area using warm cotton wool
  • Work in some nappy free time to let skin breathe
  • Change the nappy before putting the baby to sleep

If a rash persists speak to your doctor or healthcare professional.

Sources:https://www.panadol.com.au/children/first-five-years/  and https://www.nicepak.com.au/sudocrem/

Images: https://pixabay.com